Coos County Right to a Sustainable Energy Future set for May 2017 ballot

There were some victories November 8, 2016.  Two communities, Highland Township, PA and Waterville, OH each passed a bill of rights by overwhelming margins banning harmful development in their communities.

With a new president threatening to weaken already marginal environmental safeguards, now more than ever we must exercise our fundamental right to say NO to non-sustainable energy infrastructure. Yet, amidst all the sturm und drang media analysis as to how a racist, serial sexual predator, fascist, climate denier like Trump was elected and how to reinvent the democratic party from its own self-immolation most of it revolves around the same stuck in the box thinking of trying to solve the problem with the very same thinking that created it.

A few voices have stood out from the crowd like this from John Schwarz of The Intercept.

The people who run America have constructed a political system that’s like a glitchy killer robot, one even they can’t control anymore.

Working as designed it murders African Americans and pregnant women and opioid addicts

If there’s anything to learn from history, it’s that elites don’t dismantle their beloved killer robots on their own. Either regular people — including you reading this right now — will deactivate this one, or it will never happen at all. Not a single person knows exactly how to pull this off. But one thing’s for sure: Trump’s rise proves that whatever it is we’ve been doing isn’t working.

 

The community rights movement began with this same realization, that what environmentalists are doing isn’t working.  In the 40 odd years since the enactment of NEPA and the formation of the EPA our environment has gotten steadily worse with 40% of our waterways barely sustaining life while emissions have already topped 400PPM.

Social justice advocates are also realizing the same thing. The wealth gap has also grown steadily, even under Obama and corporate privileges are protected by the government while communities rights, the very act of protecting clean air and water are criminalized. Nothing demonstrates this more starkly than the recent protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline.

Clearly, whatever it is we’ve been doing isn’t working.

 

Any system of government that becomes destructive of the rights of the people and their communities is not legitimate, lawful, or constitutional.

Coos Commons Protection Council has qualified a citizen initiative, The Coos County Right to a Sustainable Energy Future Ordinance, for the May 2017 ballot. Coos along with Lincoln County are set to pass countywide bills of rights to protect citizens from industrial harm like aerial pesticide spraying and non-sustainable energy infrastructure.

Measure 6-162
Community Rights vs Corporate Privilege

What the Ordinance will do.

The ordinance will secure the right of the people of Coos County to be the decision makers about its energy future not corporations. The ordinance will protect the rights of people and ecosystems in Coos County from non-sustainable energy projects, including current corporate and government attempts to push through the pipeline and Jordan Cove LNG export terminal. It would not only prohibit the siting of such projects but also the use of eminent domain – the taking of private property – on behalf of oil and gas corporations.

What the Ordinance will NOT do.

The Ordinance will not affect the transportation of fossil fuels intended for residential, commercial, or industrial use for on-site power, heat consumption and vehicle refueling.

The Ordinance will NOT establish a home rule charter and is NOT affiliated with any charter.

Where does the Ordinance get its authority?

Its central authority is derived from the inherent and inalienable right of the people of Coos County to local, community self-government. It is a well-accepted, fundamental principle that all political power is inherent in the people, is exercised by them for their benefit, and is subject to their control.  This right is secured by the American Declaration of Independence, the Oregon constitution, and the United States Constitution. Because the right is inherent and inalienable, no government can define, diminish, or otherwise control it. Therefore, the assertion of the rights, prohibitions, and enforcement provisions in the Coos County Sustainable Energy Future ordinance come from our right exercising such decision making power.

Why do we need this Ordinance?

Coos County has experienced sustained and significant economic decline in recent decades due to ill-advised and non-sustainable development policies. In addition, we have experienced firsthand the harmful effects of unchecked resource extraction and recognize that investments in non-sustainable energy systems like the LNG pipeline and export terminal will damage Coos County.

We also recognize the importance of healthy and thriving natural communities and ecosystems and that non-sustainable energy system projects would threaten those natural systems.

We must also confront the truth that our current system of municipal governance fails to recognize the self-governing authority of the people of Coos County because corporations may assert their “rights” to override our laws. Our local government also operates on the assumption that corporate rights trump those of the people, can be preempted by state or federal legislators and agencies, and are banned from adopting laws, which have not been authorized by the state.

This means that our current municipal system of governance is illegitimate and that we are adopting this Ordinance to create a new system of municipal governance which recognizes our self-governing authority and which secures and protects our rights to a sustainable energy future.

Already, the pro-gas crowd have started polling county citizens to determine just how much they will have to spend to defeat this measure. Contribute to this campaign by following this link or you can donate via the Facebook page here

Coos County Sustainable Energy Future Community Bill of Rights

Right to a Sustainable Energy Future. All residents in Coos County possess a right to  a sustainable energy future, and the people of Coos County have the right to adopt  laws and policies to secure that right. That right shall include the authority to require the development, production, and use of sustainable energy.

Right to Scenic and Recreational Preservation. All residents of Coos County possess a right to the preservation and enhancement of the scenic, historic and aesthetic values of the County, including unspoiled vistas and outdoor recreational opportunities, thereby improving the area’s appeal to tourists and future residents.

That right shall include the right of the residents of the County to be free from activities, which threaten scenic, historic, and aesthetic values as related to the construction, siting, or operation of non-sustainable energy systems.

Rights of Natural Communities and Ecosystems to Thrive. Natural communities and ecosystems within Coos County, including but not limited to, forests, rivers, streams,  wetlands, aquifers, near shore habitats, and intertidal zones possess the right to exist,  flourish, and naturally evolve unaffected by the construction, siting, or operation of  non-sustainable energy systems.

Governmental Legitimacy. All governments owe their existence to the people of the community that those governments serve, and governments exist to secure and protect the rights of the people and those communities. Any system of government that becomes destructive of those ends is not legitimate, lawful, or constitutional.

Right to Local, Community Self-Government. The people of Coos County possess both a collective and individual right to self-government in their community, a right to a system of government that embodies that right, and the right to a system of government that protects and secures their human, civil, and collective rights.

Right &to Assert the Right to Self-Government. The people of Coos County possess the right to use their local government to make law, and the making and enforcement of  law by the people through a municipal corporation or any other institution shall not  eliminate, limit, or reduce their sovereign right to local, community self-government.

Rights are Self Executing. All rights delineated and secured by this ordinance are  inherent, fundamental, and unalienable, and shall be self-executing and enforceable  against both private and public actors.

Read the initiative n full here

You can contribute to this campaign by following this link or you can donate via the CCPC Facebook page here




Bucking the establishment anti-LNG crowd

The more I engage in community rights work the more sense the right of local self-government makes to me. Whether it is banking regulators, energy regulators or environmental regulators the working class communities are getting the short end of the stick because the industry writes the rules. One of the main rules is that communities don’t get to decide whether they want fracking waste injected into their ground water, or sewage sludge spread across their fields, or toxic emissions in the very air they breathe. In short, the rules say communities aren’t even allowed to protect their children from chemical assault. The very concept of sustainability, of developing a sustainable economy is illegal because of these rules, because we cannot say NO to non-sustainable practices. Shucks, we must live with the consequences of fracking waste injection wells, or coal and gas emissions, or aerial pesticide and herbicide spraying so we ought to have some say. That is what democracy is all about.

Presently, my efforts are focused upon the environment and sustainability but I see the potential for using the rule of law to the benefit of social and economic justice as well.  Centralized decision making, a sort of one size fits all approach to everything from fossil-fuel regulation to banking regulations and environmental regulations just allow bureaucrats appointed by the oligarchy to control the masses. So begging FERC or the governor or LUBA or DOE or DEQ or fill-in-the-blank has never set well with me. Perhaps this is why it was so easy for me to embrace the concept of affirming that communities are self determining, I don’t like groveling.

So a group of us formed the Coos Commons Protection Council and began circulating a citizen initiative to establish a local bill of rights that expands upon the existing Bill of Rights and will elevate community rights over corporate rights. When it passes, Coos County will make history as the first US county to ban a LNG terminal on the grounds that it violates our right to a sustainable energy future. Naturally, we expected push back from the pro-LNG booster crowd but we were more than a little dismayed when local anti-LNG activists turned out to be the biggest obstructionists.

For the most part Coos Commons has tried to stay out of the weeds and ignore these people although we spend an enormous amount of valuable time correcting the misinformation they put out. After attending the PIELC (Public Interest Environmental Law Conference) in Eugene we got another taste of how far and wide their efforts to thwart us have gone. Throughout the conference we were approached by fellow activists, most expressed similar dismay and sympathy for our plight and offered to help us.  One woman from Portland, however, told us that “we need to get along” as if Coos Commons has any control over the “rift.” The only way to get along, as far as we can tell, is to stop using direct democracy and stop our initiative, something we are unwilling to do.

To provide an example of the kinds of bad information we are regularly having to correct I am including my response to an email thread from a few weeks back. The thread is quite long and I was only brought in on it towards the tail end.

 

Thank you  for including me on this thread. Unfortunately, the Denton, TX example  is providing below is not a rights based ordinance and has nothing in common with community rights work. The same is true with some of the ordinances in Colorado but unfortunately people not involved in community rights are often confused and mix these ordinances up. Your statement below that these ordinances are always overturned in court is incorrect. Out of the 200 rights based ordinances passed just five are being challenged in court and those cases are yet to be decided. You are correct the ordinance allows for renewable energy used sustainably. The ordinance title is the Coos County Right to a Sustainable Energy Future after all so of course renewable energy is allowed. (it is possible to use renewable energy in a non-sustainable way).

You are also right that we need to decentralize power production. We should have a conversation about that sometime.

No one working on community rights expects a miracle fix, we are in it for the long haul and working at the state level not just the local level. Changing decades of bad policy will not happen overnight, think abolition or suffrage. Change will not happen, however, unless and until we actively start defying the rules just like they did in order to free the slaves and give women the right to vote. See my op-ed

As for comments about the fracking fight in Colorado I refer you to an op-ed penned by Cliff Willmeng from Lafayette, Colorado.  Cliff would be happy to correct any misconceptions you may have about the effort there.

Not to diminish the efforts of those filing comments but regarding Principal Power, I contacted Kevin Banister a few months ago and the decision to separate from Jordan Cove had nothing to do with public comment but was a business decision influenced by their acquisition by another company.

Mary

 

One of the points of contention is that the ordinance will prohibit the non-sustainable use of renewable energy. From the ordinance: “Non-sustainable energy systems means those systems that are controlled by state and federal energy policies, rather than community controlled energy policies; hydroelectric power and industrial scale wind power when it is not locally or municipally owned and operated…” Plopping a floating wind farm smack dab in the middle of a prime hake fishery and using Coos County as a highway to allow a corporation to sell power to California is not sustainable for Coos County. Without even getting into the enormous footprint these farms require and the toll on the ocean bed beneath them there is really nothing in it for the county to participate in this very costly scheme. In fact the State of Oregon agrees and Principle Power is, pardon the pun, pretty much dead in the water.

It may come as a surprise to many but large scale hydroelectric power is not a clean source of energy. Consider this piece from EcoWatch: The Hydropower Methane Bomb No One Wants To Talk About

 

A few months before visiting Costa Rica I had written a post for EcoWatch, “Dams Cause Climate Change: They Are Not Clean Energy.” Based on research I’d done in fighting dam proposals on my own river, the Cache le Poudre, as well as my work advocating for the already-dammed Colorado River, I’ve come to believe that hydropower is one of the biggest environmental problems our planet faces. Construction of hydroelectric dams around the world is surging dramatically, guided by the false premise that they produce clean energy, even as study after study refutes this claim.

Make no mistake, Coos Commons doesn’t claim to have all the answers but we do know that many communities are learning how to become sustainable. Some communities have developed creative ways to finance their own wind farms, for example, providing local power and keeping energy dollars local. Solar is becoming more and more affordable and the less money we spend importing power from companies like Pacific Power the more money we have to reinvest right here.

Coos Commons Protection Council along with Coos Community Radio in conjunction with area students will be holding a sustainability fair April 21. More details will come as we get closer to the event.




Additional strategies for stopping Jordan Cove LNG

As important as it is to put comments into the public record FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission), according to one source, has never denied a permit for oil and gas infrastructure unless the developer has first withdrawn the application. In recent weeks, FERC approved construction of a high-volume, high pressure natural gas pipeline that will pass within 2,500 feet of a nuclear power plant just a few miles north of New York City. One expert warned that siting the Spectra Energy pipeline in such close proximity to the Indian Point nuclear power plant could endanger tens of millions of lives yet FERC also determined that no emergency response plan is necessary.

These are just current examples of why it is so important to work not just within but also outside of the regulatory box. Our local, state and federal regulators are not in the business of denying permits. Instead, they are in the business of granting permits with conditions even though they have no resources to enforce those conditions or interest in policing the operator.

Rather than restrict our efforts to stopping a harmful project to just battling the regulatory agencies, local citizens formed the Coos Commons Protection Council and utilizing Oregon’s citizen initiative process filed an initiative to pass an ordinance and establish a countywide bill of rights that asserts our right to local self-government this November.  The Coos County Right to a Sustainable Energy Future Ordinance prohibits the construction of non-sustainable energy systems like the Jordan Cove LNG export terminal and the Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline. The ordinance will make it unlawful to use eminent domain to acquire land for non-sustainable energy systems.

This is our community and our decision! Your participation is important!

Join us for our 2nd Community Rights Presentation and Q&A
Speaker is Kai Huschke of the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund
Tuesday, March 31, 2015 beginning at 6:30PM
Owen Bldg, Coquille, Oregon

Coos County Sustainable Energy Future Ordinance

“A Community Bill of Rights for a Sustainable Energy Future”

 

What the Ordinance will do.

The ordinance will secure the right of the people of Coos County to be the decision makers about its energy future, not corporations. The ordinance will protect the rights of people and ecosystems in Coos County from non-sustainable energy projects, including current corporate and government attempts to push through the pipeline and Jordan Cove LNG export terminal. It would not only prohibited the siting of such projects but also the use of eminent domain – the taking of private property – on behalf of oil and gas corporations.

What the Ordinance will NOT do.

The Ordinance will not affect the transportation of fossil fuels intended for residential, commercial, or industrial use for on-site power, heat consumption and vehicle refueling. The Ordinance does not establish a home-rule charter.

 Where does the Ordinance get its authority?

Its central authority is derived from the inherent and inalienable right of the people of Coos County to local, community self-government. It is a well-accepted, fundamental principle that all political power is inherent in the people, is exercised by them for their benefit, and is subject to their control. This right is secured by the American Declaration of Independence, the Oregon constitution, and the United States Constitution. Because the right is inherent and inalienable, no government can define, diminish, or otherwise control it. Therefore, the assertion of the rights, prohibitions, and enforcement provisions in the Coos County Sustainable Energy Future ordinance come from our right exercising such decision making power.

Why do we need this Ordinance?

Coos County has experienced substantial population loss in recent decades due to ill-advised and non-sustainable development policies. In addition we have experienced firsthand the harmful effects of unchecked resource extraction and recognize that investments in non-sustainable energy systems like the LNG pipeline and export terminal will damage Coos County.

We also recognize the importance of healthy and thriving natural communities and ecosystems and that non-sustainable energy system projects would threaten those natural systems.

We must also confront the truth that our current system of municipal governance fails to recognize the self-governing authority of the people of Coos County because corporations may assert their “rights” to override our laws. Our local government also operates on the assumption that corporate rights trump those of the people, can be preempted by state or federal legislators and agencies, and are banned from adopting laws, which have not been authorized by the state.

This means that our current municipal system of governance is illegitimate and that we are adopting this Ordinance to create a new system of municipal governance which recognizes our self-governing authority and which secures and protects our rights to a sustainable energy future.

 




Coos Commons Protection Council DOES have a Plan B

The Coos Commons Protection Council has a Plan B. We are gaining momentum as more of our County citizens are given an opportunity to put a voice to their opposition to the Jordan Cove LNG Terminal and pipeline project. We will continue collecting signatures until ‘The Coos County Sustainable Energy Future Ordinance” qualifies for the November ballot.

Make no mistake, this ordinance is not just about Jordan Cove. It addresses the much larger issue of sustainability in Coos County’s energy future. What does that mean? It means that it is time for us to invest in projects that are community controlled and distributes the power and profits throughout our community. Across the United States, communities are investing in their capacity to move the work and advance policies and funding that prioritizes efficiency and renewable projectsMunicipal utilities, community-based co-ops, universities and other nonprofit institutions in both rural and urban settings are executing wind, solar, geothermal and biomass decentralized community owned developments. These communities are embracing solutions that protect their health and environment while creating economic prosperity.

Is this really out of the realm of possibilities for Coos County? Is it too much to ask our community to invest in community controlled on-site renewable generation? Rather than look to a foreign corporation to bring us our salvation, can we not develop alternatives that, not only protect our health and environment but puts us in charge of our economy? Instead of relying on fracked LNG and a facility that will make Coos County the number one carbon polluter in Oregon, can’t we develop the North Spit with wind and solar generation?  Locally controlled renewable energy could meet the needs of the community, protect local air quality, be sold to the grid for a profit, create local jobs, and build economic stability. Our union workers and local trades people could be trained build energy generation that benefits us all.

 The ordinance also prescribes the rights of natural communities and ecosystems to thrive. Communities began recognizing the need to advocate for the rights of nature in 2006. Since then, more than two dozen communities in the U.S. have adopted local laws that recognize the rights of nature. In November of 2010, the City of Pittsburgh in western Pennsylvania became the first major municipality in the United States to recognize rights for nature. In 2008, Ecuador became the first country in the world to recognize rights for nature in its constitution.

While this is a hard concept for many to grasp, it is important to understand that laws recognizing the rights of nature empower communities to reject governmental actions which permit unwanted and damaging development to occur – by enabling communities to assert the rights of those ecosystems that would otherwise be destroyed. Laws recognizing rights for nature begin with a different premise – that ecosystems and natural communities have the right to exist and flourish, and people, communities and governments have the authority to defend those rights on behalf of those ecosystems and communities. Our ecosystem is comprised of the Port of Charleston, the bay, the rivers and streams that feed into the bay, the forests, farmland and communities within our watershed. By acknowledging the rights of natural communities to thrive, we are protecting those habitats and, by extension, the many jobs which it sustains; those in the fishing and oyster industries, farming and forestry. A conservative estimate of the jobs that will be sacrificed in these industries to Jordan Cove and the pipeline are well over 200.

This ordinance was written and is supported by residents of Coos County. The only outside force trying to dictate terms in Coos County is Jordan Cove and FERC. We drafted this ordinance because we believe there are alternatives that can be found here in Coos Bay. John Sweet recently said that there is no plan b; if Jordan Cove isn’t built or if some other outside corporation does not ride in on their white horse, Coos County will wither and die. Those of us committed to this ordinance believe that our community can bring our collective strengths to the table and develop a sustainable economic plan that will enable Coos County to thrive. We have not thrown in the towel to the corporate gods.

Lastly, this ordinance makes the citizens of Coos County the decision makers. We believe that everyone in the county should have the opportunity to say yea or nay. If you support the ordinance, vote yes; if you disagree, vote no. But let’s not deny our fellow citizens their right to have a voice in this process. By asserting our community rights, we are establishing our right to make the critical decisions that affect our community. These rights are established in the Oregon Constitution and US Bill of Rights. Join us at facebook.com/cooscommons. It’s your decision.




Sustainable vs renewable and why ecosystems have rights

The community rights discussion hosted by the Coos Commons Protection Council appears to have helped rally more troops to the cause of asserting local self governance. The community room at the Coos Bay Fire Hall was full to capacity and except for four pro-gas boosters everyone wanted to stop the Jordan Cove LNG project. Reasons for not wanting Jordan Cove are myriad, ranging from safety to environmental issues as well as fear of having their land taken for the pipeline via eminent domain. A story published in The World illustrates the other very real worry of depending too heavily upon one industry totally subject to market forces completely beyond our control.

After an initial introduction to “working outside the box” of the standard regulatory constraints and reclaiming our right to “say no” to unsustainable development, Kai Huschke of CELDF opened the meeting up to what turned out to be a very lively discussion. One of the main topics, naturally, is the citizen initiative The Coos County Right to a Sustainable Energy Future Ordinance.”

What the Ordinance will do.
The ordinance will secure the right of the people of Coos County to be the decision makers about its energy future. The ordinance will protect the rights of people and ecosystems in Coos County from non-sustainable energy projects, including current corporate and government attempts to push through the pipeline and Jordan Cove LNG export terminal. It would not only prohibit the siting of such projects but also the use of eminent domain – the taking of private property – on behalf of foreign and domestic oil and gas corporations.

What the Ordinance will NOT do.

The Ordinance will not affect the transportation of fossil fuels intended for residential, commercial, or industrial use for on-site power, heat consumption and vehicle refueling.

Sustainable vs Renewable

One of the pro-gas attendees raised questions about two components of the ordinance. The first stems from the following clause taken from Section 2 – Definitions

(d) Non-sustainable energy systems means those systems that are controlled by state and federal energy policies, rather than community controlled energy policies; hydroelectric power and industrial scale wind power when it is not locally or municipally owned and operated; energy systems using fossil fuels, including but not limited to coal, natural gas, petroleum products, nuclear and radioactive materials and other fuel sources that are non-renewable, or which produce toxins and substances that cause injury to humans or natural communities and ecosystems, or that are in violation of resident’s right to a sustainable energy future.

Concerns were raised that the ordinance would prohibit the continued import of hydroelectric energy from Bonneville Dam, from which most of our current energy is derived. The ordinance will not prohibit these sources of electricity when used for on-site power for residential, commercial or industrial use. Defining centralized industrial or utility scale wind and hydro is simply differentiating between sustainable  and unsustainable use of renewable energy. Massive wind farms like Shepherd’s Flat in Eastern Oregon that gobble up local ranches using eminent domain and ship power to California may be considered a renewable resource but isn’t necessarily a sustainable practice. The same can be said for hydroelectric dams.  In retrospect, the ordinance should also have included centralized solar systems under this section.

The ordinance does not prohibit the sustainable use of renewable energy, quite the contrary. Local wind farms and decentralized wind, solar and hydro installations are fully embraced as long as the power is locally controlled and power/profits distributed within the county.

The other concern was about giving nature rights.

Rights of Nature

All too few people object to conveying human rights or “personhood” status to legal creatures like corporations. Too many submissively acquiesce to elevating corporate rights above those of the individual and community so much so that a Canadian company may force US landowners to give up their land using the power of eminent domain. Nonetheless, Jordan Cove proponents attending the discussion and even some opponents of the project have balked at the concept of acceding rights to nature despite our very dependence on nature to survive.

Under our current system of law nature is regarded as “property” that only has value if and when its resources are extracted even if that extraction destroys an entire ecosystem and diminishes our quality of life. Section 3.  Statements of Law – Community Bill of Rights of the proposed ordinance addresses this issue by acknowledging nature is not property, at least when it comes to non-sustainable energy systems.

(c) Rights of Natural Communities and Ecosystems to Thrive. Natural communities and ecosystems within Coos County, including but not limited to, forests, rivers, streams, wetlands,aquifers, near shore habitats, and intertidal zones possess the right to exist, flourish, and naturally evolve unaffected by the construction, siting, or operation of non-sustainable energy systems.

This ordinance does not allow a herd of elk to obtain legal counsel to seek an injunction against hunters or grant civil liberties to your backyard trees. It simply acknowledges that nature existed long before the man made construct of “property” ever came into our collective consciousness.  It means “…that nature in all its life forms has the right to exist, persist, maintain and regenerate its vital cycles.  The ecosystem itself can be named as a rights bearing subject with standing in a court of law.”

Nature’s right to thrive as described within this ordinance provides another layer of legal protection only against unwanted non-sustainable energy systems.

Layers

In closing, it is worth pointing out a couple of observations. Interestingly, one staunch proponent of LNG claimed he opposes hydraulic fracturing. Similarly, another Jordan Cove supporter I know opposes the use of eminent domain for purposes of building the pipeline. Unfortunately, Jordan Cove will be fed by “fracked” natural gas from the Rocky Mountain States and the supporting Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline cannot be built without using eminent domain to obtain easements from unwilling landowners. One cannot support Jordan Cove LNG without also supporting these other practices.




Community rights discussion meeting almost full

Coos Commons Protection Council is hosting a discussion, “Not in Our Backyard”, at the Coos Bay Fire Hall this Thursday, the 29th beginning at 6PM. There are only 10 9 7 3 spaces left as of this morning. If you would like to attend, act now and RSVP to cooscommons@gmail.org.

 

No Pipeline In Our Backyard!

Coos Commons Protection Council

is pleased to host a discussion on

Community Rights and democracy in Coos County

From Ohio to Pennsylvania to New Hampshire to Oregon, oil and gas pipelines are invading our communities.

In Oregon, the Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline and Jordan Cove export terminal are moving full steam ahead, aided by federal and state agencies, despite warnings of real impacts to quality of life, private property, local economies, and ecosystems across four Oregon counties.

Learn how communities, in Oregon and other states, are changing the rules of the game, squaring up against pipeline corporations and their own government, and taking back their rights to health, resiliency, and greater democracy for people and nature.

90-minute presentation and Q&A

Coos Bay Fire Hall Community Room

450 Elrod Avenue, Coos Bay, Oregon

January 29, 2015

6 – 8PM

RSVP CoosCommons@gmail.com

Visit http://cooscommons.org for more information

Kai Huschke, Northwest Organizer

Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund




FERC meeting tonight at Hale Center

The first of several hearings begin today at the SOCC campus in the Hale Performing Arts Center. Citizens are given 3 minutes to have their oral comments entered into the record.

Coos Commons Protection Council will be collecting signatures for The Coos County Right to a Sustainable Energy Future Ordinance.

 

All meetings will begin at 6:00 p.m. and are scheduled as follows:

 

Date Location
Monday, December 8, 2014 Southwest Oregon Community College

Hales Performing Arts Center

1988 Newmark Ave.

Coos Bay, OR 97420

541-888-7250

Tuesday, December 9, 2014 Umpqua Community College

Lang Center

1140 Umpqua College Rd.

Roseburg, OR 97470

541-440-4705

Wednesday, December 10, 2014 Seven Feathers Casino-Hotel & Convention Center

146 Chief Miwaleta Ln.

Canyonville, OR 97417

800-548-8461 ext. 1218

Thursday, December 11, 2014 Central Medford High School

815 S. Oakdale Ave.

Medford, OR 97501

541-842-3669

541-842-3680

Friday, December 12, 2014 Oregon Institute of Technology

College Union Auditorium

3201 Campus Dr.

Klamath Falls, OR 97601

541-895-1032

Saturday, December 13, 2014 Malin Community Hall

2307 Front St.

Malin, OR 97632

541-723-4141